Swiffer Wet Jet Pads

Swiffer Wet Jet Pads

Swiffer Wet Jet Pads might just be the best product you never knew about. I say this because at one time I didn’t know what all the fuss was about over a simple, light-weight floor, light-duty floor mop. I learned differently when I had my basement floor finished in laminate. What was once a arduous, long task of sweeping then mopping has turned into a very quick and efficient job with the swiffer wet jet pads. The secret is how well this works is not in the mop but in the pads!

You can spend most of your hardwood or laminate floor cleaning by simply using the Swiffer Dry Pads. Essentially, these replaces the need for a broom and a dustpan. Simply attach them to the head of your swiffer broom and they will literally pick up dust, dirt, and small debris like a magnet. Little or no elbow grease is required. Often times my laminate floor shows a fine film of dust when the sun shines through the windows in the morning. This is how I know the floor needs a quick clean up. When you cannot get it looking clean with the dry pads (not too often), you know it is time to switch to the Swiffer wet jet pads.

How to use Swiffer Dry Pads

Swiffer Wet Jet Pads

How to use both dry and wet pads with the Swiffer

The cute, little video below shows you how simple it is to dry and wet clean with the Swiffer. Swiffer also makes a complete Swiffer Starter Kit with spray feature. This is totally unnecessary. As the video below indicates, the simple, manual, hand-held, wet/dry broom for $12.00 works just fine.

Tip: Getting the most from your Swiffer Wet Pads

Don’t throw the wet pad away after you’ve used it or think it has gotten dirty on one side. Turn it inside out. Obviously, you will want to use the scrub strip pad first for the real, grimy stuff, but the other side is still wet and ready to help you get your floors sparkling clean.

Where to get Swiffer Pads and Accessories

Windward IV Ceiling Fan

Windward IV Ceiling Fan

I bought the Windward IV Ceiling Fan from Home Depot to replace the old, slow ceiling fan that came with my house’s master bedroom about 12 years ago. I have been very comfortably blown-away ever since. The old fan, for some reason just never did move much air. The other problem with the old fan was that the remote would receive interference and the light would randomly go off and on in the middle of the night. For that reason it stayed off. Having suffered 12 years of warm, uncomfortable summer nights in the upstairs bedroom, I thought it was finally time to do something about it.

Installation of the Windward IV Ceiling Fan

I won’t waste your time explaining how to install the Windward IV fan. There are plenty of good instructions. I put the video below on my laptop and followed it one step at a time.

Don’t be fooled into thinking that installing the fan is more complicated than it really is. Installation is every bit as easy as the video explained. There is one caveat and I will give you one huge tip that will save you time, money, headaches, and possibly even a bill from an electrician. Make sure you completely uninstall your old fan. I ended up with an extra red wire that I did not know what to do with. After trying several different wiring combinations, I could not get the fan blades to spin properly and the LED lights continually blinked. The electrician very thoroughly inspected the wiring inside the wall plate where the old fan was installed and noticed the remote was still connected. This completely explained why the wires didn’t match like they did on the video. He simply snipped the wires from the old remote and replaced it with the new Windward IV remote. In 20 minutes the fan and lights were working like a champ. Let me tell you what I really like about this fan.

Windward IV Benefits and Features

The Windward IV remote can be temperature controlled via a thermostat so it turns on or off based on the internal temperature of the room where the ceiling fan is located. There are three fan-speed settings which work like a toggle. The light, of course, can be turned off without use of the fans at all. Here’s a cool feature: The included LED lights are dimmable via the remote. To dim them, simply, press the light button and hold. The lights when turned off and back on will resume back to their previous brightness state.

Ultra Quiet Fan

The thing I might like best about the Windward IV fan is how quiet it is. Even on full speed, you can barely hear the motor above the sound of the air moving beneath its blades. It really is a high quality, smooth-operating, well-built ceiling fan. I highly recommend it.

Does Nest Thermostat Save Money?

Does Nest Thermostat Save Money


It’s a fun and cool technology gadget, but does Nest thermostat save money? Truth be told, I had my heart set on buying one of these regardless of the answer to the money-savings question. There are lots of things I already knew I liked about the Nest thermostat. Before we talk about the possibility that Nest might save money on my energy bill, let me delve into these:

What I Like about the Nest Thermostat

For one thing, I like the looks of the Nest. I like the large, round display. I like the round appearance with easy-to-grab, hand dial for turning temperatures up and down. I also like how I can change the display to analog clock, digital clock, weather, actual temperature, or set temperature. I like that I can adjust the temperature from any room in the house. Installation of the Nest thermostat was very logical and straightforward with the included instructions. The Nest company took every care and precaution to make sure all steps are followed. They even were smart enough to recommend taking a picture of the wiring before removing anything. I installed mine without having to turn off my main breaker. I simply took Nest’s advice, turned off only the switch to the thermostat, then verified the power was off by attempting to turn up the heat. I was very comfortable removing and reinserting wires and the installation was simple. Using the basic features of Nest was equally simple to learn. I grabbed the large outer dial and turned it to 70 degrees and voila. I was set. Next, I downloaded the app to and set it up for my iPhone. No problem there either. It is also very clear how to program a set schedule for the Nest. What isn’t so clear is instructions that tell me how Nest is actually going to learn my habits and program itself? How many days must I turn he heat down and up before it recognizes the pattern? After a week thus far, my Nest is still not adjusting temperatures by itself. What is also not clear in the instructions is whether or not I can use the manual programming setting and auto-learning feature at the same time. I setup a schedule and the Auto-Learning is still on and informing me that it is learning. Will the manual schedule disrupt it or will it continue to learn adjacent to my manual schedule that I have already set? This leads us right back to the question: How does Nest thermostat save money?

Does Nest Thermostat Save Money?

I have always used a manual schedule to program my thermostat. My thermostat adjusts according to our habits. I turn it down to 62 when I go to bed at night and warms the house back up to 70 by the time I get up at 5:00AM. At 6:30AM the temperature goes back down to 64 while I’m at work for the day. The house is warm once again when I get back home in the afternoon. That’s me. Well, after talking to a few people, I was surprised to learn that not everyone has a manual schedule setup for their existing thermostats. For this reason, the Nest company can probably truthfully claim that it saves a lot of people a great deal of money. For someone who already has a specific and effective temperature schedule, I see very little ways Nest’s auto-learning can improve upon that. Having the ability and convenience to set temps away from home and in other rooms in the house might play a small role in helping with the energy bill. So, my conclusion (yet to be prove) is that the Nest thermostat can save a household owner some money depending on how they were using their previous thermostat.